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Talk To Frank

More Regarding Talk To Frank

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

Ten years prior a police Swat group collided with a calm suburban kitchen and transformed the substance of medication education in the UK until the end of time. People were seriously warned to stay away from the drug peddlers around sports arenas and that they could be destroyed by drugs. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


In the first advertisement a teenager phoned a police team to detain his mother when she proposed that they had a peaceful discussion regarding drugs. But the new information being passed is: "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank: Cordial Private Drug Guidance

Devised by the advertising agency, Mother, Frank was actually the National Drugs Helpline brand new name. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


According to Justin Tindall, creative director of Leo Burnett ad agency, the most important thing is that no one could accuse frank of trying to be "down with the kids," or coming out with the wrong attire. Parody videos on YouTube have not been able to disrespect Frank either. One more thing that distinguishes Frank from other government-funded campaigns is that nothing links the ad to the government in anyway whatsoever.

Right from the days of Nancy Reagan, a lot has been done about drugs education, and the Grange Hill cast which a lot of people opine that it did more harm than good, simply encouraged people to "Just Say No" to drugs.


The majority of the advertisements in Europe currently concentrate, like Frank, on attempting to share objective info to assist youngsters to make their own choices. You still see pictures of prison bars and upset parents, though, in countries where dealing drugs will get you in serious trouble with the law. One late battle in Singapore told youthful clubbers: "You play, you pay."

Above the Influence is a campaign that mixes jokes and warning stories that the federal government has been using in the UK for a long time; it also offers positive alternatives to drugs. The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. However, an amazing number of anti-drug battles far and wide still fall back on terrify strategies and specifically, the drug driven "fall into hell." One typical example was a part of the Canadian DrugsNot4Me program showed an attractive, confident young woman then into a wasting, hollow eyes shadow at the hand of drugs.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


"Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world" was used in one of the early internet ad campaigns.

Understanding the true information behind the message was very difficult. The man in arrears the cocaine advertisement, Matt Powell, then creative director of digital agency Profero, now disbelieves he overvalued the focus span of the ordinary web browser. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


What Is Frank?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It's supposed to reduce the use of illegal and legal substances by teaching teens about the possible effects of alcohol and drugs. It has had several media campaigns on the Internet and the radio.


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FRANK has the following resources for anyone looking for information about drugs:

  • A dedicated website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat service, available from 2pm-6pm daily
  • A service to locate counselling and treatment