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What Is Drug Addiction?

Drug dependence is an unrelenting illness that presents in obsessive, or out of control drive to access the drug at any cost even when one is aware of the danger and long lasting harm effects on their brain. The harmful habits of people suffering from drug addiction come as a result of these changes inside the brain. Drug compulsion is likewise a backsliding illness. Relapse means going back after some time, to using the substance one had stopped using.


Drug dependency grows from a deliberate choice to take a substance. However, the mental strength to decide whether to use drugs or not is eroded with time. Looking for and taking the drugs gets to be distinctly compulsive. This is mainly because of the effects of long-term substance exposure on the functioning of the brain. The parts of the brain that control reward and motivation, learning and memory, and self control are all significantly affected by addiction.

Dependency is an illness that affects behaviour and the brain.


Is There Treatment For Drug Dependency?

It can, however it is hard. Since addiction is a chronic ailment, individuals can't just quit utilizing drugs for a couple days and be treated. For most patients, long term often repeated care is needed to help them stop using and continue on to get their lives back.


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Dependency treatment must assist the individual to achieve the following

  • Stopping to require using the drug
  • abstain from drugs
  • Be a productive member of society, in the family, and at work

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

These principles must be involved, if any efficient treatment program must be arrived at, as opined by several scientific researches since mid-1970s

  • Though a complex brain altering illness, drug dependency can be successfully treated.
  • No exclusive treatment is correct for everybody.
  • Individuals must be able to access treatment quickly.
  • Treatment deals with more than just drug use, addressing all of the patient's needs.
  • Adhering to treatment sufficiently long is critical.
  • The prevalently applied types of treatment include counselling and some other therapies that centre on behaviours.
  • When medications are administered in conjunction with behavioural therapies, they form a valuable part of the treatment.
  • In order to accommodate the needs of the patient, treatment methods must be appraised with changes in the patient's needs.
  • Treatment should deal with other potential mental disorders.
  • Medically assisted detoxification is just the very first step of the treatment.
  • The treatment does not rely on the volition of the patient to yield positive fruits.
  • During treatments, the use of drugs by the patient must be properly observed.
  • Treatment projects ought to test patients for HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis and different chronic infections in addition show them about strides they can go for broke of these illnesses.

How Is Substance Dependency Treated?

Effective treatment consists of several steps

  • detoxification (the process through which drug is expelled from the body)
  • behavioural counselling
  • medication (for tobacco, opioid, or alcohol addiction)
  • Diagnosis and management mental illness associated with drug addiction such as hopelessness and nervousness
  • Avoiding relapse by providing long term follow up care

Success could be achieved through different types of care that come with customised treatment method and follow-up options.


Treatment ought to incorporate both therapeutic and emotional well-being services as required. Follow-up care may comprise group or family-based recuperation supportive networks.


How Is Drug Addiction Treated With Medication?

Managing withdrawal symptoms, preventing relapse, and treating coexisting conditions are accomplished through medication use.

  • Withdrawal During rehab, taking some prescription drugs assists in reducing withdrawal reactions. Detoxing from the drug is not the only necessary treatment, merely the first step in the process. Patient who doesn't get any further treatment after detoxification as a rule resumes their drug usage. The SAMHSA, 2014 study has shown that about 80% of detox programmes use prescription drugs.
  • Relapse Prevention Patients can utilize medicines to help rebuild normal brain functioning and reduce desires. There are medications for the treatment of addictions to alcohol, tobacco/nicotine, and opioids, such as heroin or prescription pain pills. Researchers are creating different solutions to manage stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) dependence Treatment for every substance they have ever abused will be necessary for those that use multiple drugs.

Behavioural Therapies - How Are They Employed To Treat Drug Dependency?

Behavioural treatments aid patients

  • change his/her behaviour and attitude related to the substance use
  • Adopt healthier psychosocial competency
  • carry on with other kinds of treatment, like medication

Treatment is available to patients in many different types of locations which use various methods.

Outpatient treatment is an option where a wide range of programs are available for patients who continue to visit behavioural health professionals regularly. The greater parts of the projects include individual or group drug advising, or both.


These projects normally offer types of behavioural treatment, for example,

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, which helps patients perceive, dodge and adapt to the circumstances in which they are destined to utilise drugs
  • Multidimensional family therapy, which is for teenage addicts and their families to understand all of the factors influencing the patterns of drug abuse and works on improving the family's ability to function
  • motivational interviewing, that makes the most of a person's willingness to alter their behaviour and start treatment
  • contingency management (motivational incentives), which makes use of positive reinforcement to motivate refraining from substances

At first, treatment can be as intensive as multiple outpatient sessions every week. regular outpatient treatment that involves fewer meeting hours few days of the week after the intensive treatment in the bid to ensure a sustained healing process.


Residential/inpatient treatment can also be extremely successful, particularly for patients with more serious issues (including co-occurring conditions). Authorised residential treatment centre offers 24-hour organized and proper care, including safe lodging and medicinal consideration. Inpatient treatment facilities can use many therapeutic approaches and are usually working toward assisting the patient after treatment to maintain a drug free, crime free lifestyle.


Cases of residential treatment settings include

  • Therapeutic communities which are exceedingly organised programs in which patients stay at a home, normally for 6 to 12 months. Everybody at the facility, whether caregivers or administrators and fellow patients play a role in the recovery of the patient helping them cope with the changes and challenges of withdrawal.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, where detoxification is done and the patient prepared for community based treatment through preliminary intensive counselling.
  • Short term, supervised housing for patients called recovery housing is sometimes utilized after residential treatment. The recovery housing programme provides a bridge for the patients between the long term inpatient facility and re-joining the society; patients are helped to prepare for life on the outside by enabling them to look for jobs and learn how to take care and budget their money.

Difficulties Of Re-Passage

The excessive urge to take drugs could be "triggered" by several factors within the brain, as the workings of the brain is altered by drug abuse. It is key for patients in treatment, particularly those treated at prison or inpatient facilities, to learn how to identify, steer clear of, and deal with triggers that they are most likely to experience after treatment.